28 October 2013

Dismantled my dreams in a skeleton pile


There's a tiniest nature museum in a cellar near my old home town, and I thought some of you might enjoy a little peek inside! I shot these photos a good share of time ago and found them just now while browsing through files. I for one can't stop staring at those bone formations in all their delicacy and beauty! I just hope they all died natural deaths, although that's hardly the case.

There's a lot of taxidermy, domestic animal skulls, butterflies, moths and other critters and even fetus jars on those shelves and glass cabinets (or glass coffins). Captured under time and glass, never moving forward. I always get a baffling feeling of child-like wonder and sadness while visiting museums of natural history, like I don't wish to see these empty animal shells but can't stop looking at them either.



One corner holds a genuine human skeleton of a John Doe from WW2. A German soldier lost in battle, if I remember correctly. Some have insisted that the remains should be buried, but I think it's only fair to have human parts on display too, as we are not a separate thing from nature.


I think some kind of a "bones" or "museum" tag would be in place as there's so many posts here including those things. Hmmm, we'll see if that happens! The tagging system doesn't always work for me as I often forget to use it. Oh how I sometimes wish I was more organized.

25 comments:

  1. Gorgeous, I can see where Alexander McQueen got his inspiration from.

    /Avy

    http://mymotherfuckedmickjagger.blogspot.com

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    1. Oh yes! He was one of the best designers that ever lived, so many gorgeous creations.

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  2. Amazing! And I totally agree with you on the sadness part. It is kinda sad to se the animals dead and all, but also very interesting! I truly hope they have died a natural death, but as you say, that is probably not so possible... Sadly. And I love the idea of having a human skeleton there too! We are just as much animal as any other species.

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    1. I think I remember that some skulls had notes that the animal had been found dead, but I'm sure at least some of them were hunted down and donated to the museum. And at least the bugs were killed to capture them before they decayed, I think. :< And I agree, a human skeleton is necessary as we do not differ from other species.

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  3. This photos are extremely beautiful! What is this museum called, if somebody wants to visit it? :)

    I understand your point about how humans are part of nature and I agree that humans should be a part of a natural history exhibition. But I can also see the point of those who want John Doe to get a burial, because a body or a skeleton given as a voluntary donation would suit their ethics better. On the other hand, how about history museums with skulls 3000 years old? Is it right to pick them out of their graves and give them to people to stare at?

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    1. Thanks so much, I'm happy you liked the photos! It's just called Luontomuseo (in Iisalmi), but I'm sure there are many similar ones in this country. The best one by far is of course The Finnish Museum of Natural History in Helsinki, I highly recommend visiting it if you haven't done so before!

      You've got a good point, a donation would always be better. :) Our culture does have a respect for the dead and their graves, but that's the spiritual approach. I also have a respect for the dead but I just feel our skeletons aren't any more sacred than the bones of animals. It's the same bone matter in different form and it's interesting to study them. We're curious beings, so I feel it's ok to put things on display for wonder and education. Or maybe I just have a pretty neutral approach to the matter after spending six summers at the graveyard, hehe.

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  4. Absolutely love the pinned moths, they have such a ghostly romantic look.

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    1. I agree, ghostly is a good word for describing them!

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  5. I absolutely love these photos!

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  6. Tosi kauniita kuvia! Tallensin pari inspiraatiokansion syövereihin, että voin kaivaa ne esiin, kun inspiraationpuute vaivaa

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    1. Ihana kuulla että inspiroivat, kiitos! :)

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  7. I wonder how the soldier died, there aren't any obvious signs of trauma. Perhaps he was one of the poor souls who died from cold, hunger and disease. Whilst it is sad, I think it's important to have human skeletons to learn anatomy from (and the same for the animal collections), and it's good that these specimens are well cared for and protected for future generations.

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    1. I don't know, I can't remember if there was any info about the cause of death or the place where he was found. And I agree, studying and keeping them safe is important although it feels sad. Personally I don't think it's ever justified to kill an animal to get to its body parts, but natural death is a different thing.

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  8. I love these types of museum. One can get a bit sad but I think that is just a healthy sign.
    I feel a need to go visit a museum now. It has been too long!

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    1. Then you should visit a museum right away! :)

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  9. Noista "piikitetyistä" perhosista tulee aina hiukan surumieli :( Mutta kauniita ne kyllä on. Samoin eläinten kallot.

    Mukavaa aina lukea näitä sun mietteitä, kun olen itse ihan samaa mieltä :') Että ihminen on luontokappale ja "vain" lihaa ja luita siinä missä mikä tahansa eläin.

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    1. Kiva kuulla että samanmielisiä löytyy. :) Harmi että ihmiset usein älyllisen ylemmyyden harhoissaan luulee olevansa jollain tasolla parempia kuin muut luontokappaleet, mikä on ihan älyttömän surullista. Koko ajatus on iskostunut niin syvälle kulttuuriin että hirvittää.

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  10. Upeita otoksia. :) Museoissa tulee kyllä aina sellainen fiilis, että elämä ja hetki on pysähtynyt, hieman utopistinen ja suruisa olo. Kuitenkin tuo täytetty otus on joskus ollut elävä, ja nyt se on tuossa tyhjänä tuijottamassa.. tyhjyyteen.

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    1. Kiitoksia :) Se tunne on kyllä outo, pysähtynyt ja samalla surullisen kaunis.

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  11. This is one of your most interesting and inspiring notes. Thank you for sharing these beautiful photographs. Your style of writing reminds me of Poe.
    All the best, beautiful Moth!

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    1. Oh, I'm so happy to hear you enjoyed this post! And thank you for your lovely words <3

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  12. Such a lovely post. Melancholic, yet beautiful.

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